Chameleon by Angelique Anjou

New Concepts Publishing

Futuristic, Shape-shifter

ISBN: 1-58608-348-2

Reviewed by Patrice F.

   

 

When the humans settled on the new world, they were forced to negotiate for land with aliens that already inhabited the planet.  Nouri decided to observe the strangers, suspicious of their motives and fearing that they would not honor the agreement.  He was right, and the price for his knowledge was getting caught in a trap set by human poachers.  One of the colonists, Cara, comes to his aid, and he becomes entranced by her.   

Cara has always resented her parentsí decision to leave Earth.   She is happy when she discovers a mythological beast in the alien sacred forest.  Although she is violating the treaty, she returns again and again to find him.  Cara is willing to risk everything for the beast she calls Raeólittle does she know that nothing is as it seems. 

I genuinely liked Chameleon, yet it doesnít compare to Ms. Anjouís other work, which for me carries more heft.  The story is well-written but much lighter fare despite the angst.  Perhaps Iíve become more used to the layered intricacy used in previous books, although itís not fair to compare Chameleon to them simply because itís limited to less than 100 pages.  This is a good story hovering on the brink of ďvery good,Ē yet wavering, due to limited to space.  Or so it seemed to me.  I would have preferred for it to be longer and I wanted more time to get to know Nouri and his people.   Cara is realistically depicted, and her character made it easy to connect to the story.  The humor is wonderful, and Iíve always admired the way this author uses comedic elements to make fun of situations that rightly deserve it.   Although this story fell a bit short of my expectations, I got a kick out of reading it.  There is not very much that could detract from Ms. Anjouís creative writing skills and thatís enough for me to continue reading her work.

     

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